Fall Classes Scheduled

Greetings to all. It has been a while. I have scheduled two classes for this fall and plans are being made for the spring of 2018. All classes are held at the Hershey Library in Hershey, PA.

This fall I will explore image processing in Lightroom in detail. This will be Saturday October 21, 2017 from 9:30 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. I will look at each processing panel and tool in the Develop module to show how to control tone and color of your images. Many photographers can enhance their images without the need for manipulating pixels in Photoshop or Elements and this class will show you how that is done.

Speaking of Elements, if you need (or want) to manage the pixels in your images the second class is for you. On Saturday November 11, 2017, from 9:30 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. I will show you how to use selections, masks, and blend modes to enhance your images. I will also show you how to replace boring skies and composite images for greater impact. If you are an Elements user, this class will take you to a new level of control of your images.

Spring of 2018 will bring the first class in advanced Photoshop techniques. No date is yet set for this class. Advanced selection techniques, use of channels and apply image techniques for better masking, and learning how the numbers work to insure better image output are at the head of the list.

Information on classes and other good stuff is always available at my Learning Page.

Learning Lightroom

Lightroom is an image mangement tool and a file processor.

Lightroom is an image management tool (database) and a file processor. This means it can manage your images for you allowing more efficient filing and retrieval of images as well as defining the parameters to use to process raw and other files for export either into an editor like Photoshop or a final file for printing or sharing. By defining parameters I mean that Lightroom writes data to a file that tells the processor what to do to that file on export. It does not directly modify the file – it creates instructions on how to modify the file. That is the database part, along with remembering where files are located.

Think of Lightroom as a library card catalog. The card catalog does not contain the books, but references to where the books can be found. Lightroom references where your files can be found on a hard drive. The Lightroom catalog is metadata; information about other data, which is your image file. Initially, the information is location of the file, resolution, color space, copyright, keywords, etc. As you process an image, more data is written to the catalog as instructions on how to process your image. I suggest you also set preferences to export settings to an XMP sidecar file. This copies the processing, ratings and other information to a file that accompanies the raw file in your hard drive and gives you an additional measure of backup, and the ability to open the file with modifications intact in Bridge or ACR.

If you modify a file outside of Lightroom the XMP file for that file will contain the changes, but Lightroom will not automatically update the database to reflect those changes. An icon will appear in LR (up arrow with lines at top right) indicating that the XMP file has changed. Click on the icon and you will be asked whether to import the modifications from the XMP file or not.

I will be presenting a 3 hour seminar on Lightroom next Saturday, March 11, 2017 at the Hershey Library starting at 9:30 a.m. You will need to sign up through the library. Sign up for the seminar at the Hershey Library. The cost is $45.

I will be presenting a Photoshop seminar at the Hershey Library on April 29th (same time, same channel). Hope to see you.

Lightroom Seminar

Bryson Leidich will present a three hour Lightroom seminar on Saturday March 11th at the Hershey Library.

The seminar in will run from 9:30 to about 1:00. Lightroom setup and preferences will be addressed as well as best practices for image storage and retrieval. Primary attention will be directed to workflow and especially to processing of raw files. Interaction with Photoshop or Elements will also be addressed.

The seminar will be good for beginning users and users with experience as well. Refining your image processing capabilities never ends, as well as learning what can and cannot be done with Lightroom.

Bring your laptop if you wish to follow along with the demonstration, but it not required. Bring a memory card with

a problem file you need help with. Bryson will analyze as many files as possible to help understand shooting and processing practices.

Fee for the seminar is $45. Sign up for the seminar at the Hershey Library.

A Photoshop seminar is planned for April 1st